Employment Equity Report 2013-2014

Table of Contents

Introduction

Employment Equity Initiatives During This Reporting Period

  1. Aboriginal Engagement Program
  2. Persons with Disabilities
  3. Other Initiatives

Workforce Analysis

Analysis of Total Employee Population

Table 1 - Comparison of Total Employee Population with Availability Data

Analysis by Employment Equity Occupational Groups

Table 2 - Comparison of Employee Population with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups

Analysis of the Numbers of Employee Hires, Promotions and Regrettable Departures

Table 3 - Comparison of Employee Hires with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups

Table 4 - Employee Promotions by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups

Table 5 - Employee Regrettable Departures by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups

Conclusion

Introduction

The human resources management focus of the National Energy Board (NEB) is to ensure it has the right people, at the right time, for the right jobs. The NEB is committed to providing an inclusive workplace.  The corner stone of our initiatives are based on the legislative requirements under the Employment Equity Act.

Employment Equity looks at the following groups when determining gaps in a work force:  Women, Aboriginal People, Visible Minorities and Persons with Disabilities.

This annual report on Employment Equity for the NEB provides a description of Employment Equity activities and an analysis of the results achieved during the reporting period from 01 April 2013 to 31 March 2014.  In addition, the report provides a workforce description of the employees at the NEB as of 31 March 2014 and includes an analysis of internal representation versus labour market availability.

The Organization

The NEB is an independent, federal, quasi-judicial regulatory tribunal.  The NEB’s corporate purpose is to regulate pipelines, energy development and trade in the Canadian public interest. The NEB’s vision is to be active and effective in Canada’s pursuit of a sustainable energy future. 

The main functions of the NEB are set out in the National Energy Board Act.  The NEB also has regulatory responsibilities under the Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act and certain provisions of the Canada Petroleum Resources Act.  The NEB has specific responsibilities under the Energy Administration Act and the Northern Pipeline Act.  In addition, some NEB staff are appointed Health and Safety Officers by the Minister of Labour to administer Part II of the Canada Labour Code as it applies to facilities regulated by the Board.

All employees of the NEB are headquartered in a single work location in Calgary. Since February 2004, all unionized employees have been represented by the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada (PIPSC), the one union certified as the Bargaining Agent for the NEB.

The NEB follows a strategic planning process that establishes priorities to meet its mandate.  In the current environment of increasing global demand for safe and secure supplies of energy and continuing high energy prices, the NEB’s role as Canada’s national energy regulator is as important as ever.  We are challenged to maintain a skilled and knowledgeable workforce in a very competitive employment market, especially in Calgary where a thriving private sector oil and gas industry makes it difficult to attract and retain qualified staff.  We continue to promote diversity and eliminate barriers to employment.

Analysis

Data Sources:  This report uses 2006 Census Availability data received from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) to compare overall representation of the designated groups (Women Aboriginal People, Visible Minorities) at the NEB with the composition of the local population (Calgary). Persons with Disabilities data is at the National levels as those statistics are not available at the local level. In previous years the NEB has used national data for all groups; utilizing local data provides a more accurate comparison.

HRSDC’s Workplace Equity Information Management System (WEIMS), is used to determine the statistics within this report.

Employment Equity Initiatives During This Period

The NEB Employment Equity and Diversity Plan (EEDP) 2011-2014 focuses on achieving excellence through our employees. Given the unique role that the NEB plays on behalf of the Canadian public, the greatest challenge is to attract and retain the best people possible. The EEDP recognizes that we must embrace and represent diversity and move beyond considering diversity as a purely intellectual exercise to it becoming an inherent component of our organizational culture. The EEDP is monitored, reported on and updated annually.

The Board is in the process of reviewing the Duty to Accommodate Policy; procedures and guidelines will be finalized in the fall of 2013.

The intent is to ensure this policy provides for an inclusive, barrier-free, non-discriminatory workplace, allowing for the full participation of both its employees and selection process candidates.

Aboriginal Engagement Program

The NEB continued to refine its Aboriginal Engagement Program by targeting recruitment of Aboriginal candidates. Part of the purpose of this program is to increase internal capacity to understand aboriginal issues and, in turn, raise the awareness in Aboriginal communities of the role of the NEB.

In addition, in partnership with other federal departments and industry in Calgary, the NEB continues to promote and encourage employees to participate in meetings and celebrations respecting diversity, as well as commemorative events and awareness training.

Persons with Disabilities

Through the Duty to Accommodate Policy, our focus has been to promote an inclusive healthy and productive work environment.  Accommodation is provided to employees as required and includes providing modified work to injured workers. Work schedules are adjusted to provide variable start times where circumstances warrant and modified work weeks are provided whenever feasible. Ergonomic assessments of individual work stations continue to be provided.  Employees with disabilities who require that measures be implemented in order to accommodate their needs are given attention.

The Duty to Accommodate Policy, procedures and guidelines were updated.  The intent is to ensure this policy provides for an inclusive, barrier-free, non-discriminatory workplace, allowing for the full participation of both its employees and selection process candidates.

Other Related Initiatives

The NEB Employment Equity and Diversity Committee (EEDC), comprised of Management, Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada (PIPSC) Union representation, Employment Equity Members (employees) and Human Resources was active.  The Committee is responsible for monitoring the progress of the EEDP and for making recommendations to enhance the program.
                                                           
EEDC launched a new program for employees to learn about other employees and their travels and/or their home countries.  Employees volunteered to participate as presenters.  Discussions included such topics as cultural differences, background, language, indigenous animals, landscape and everyday lifestyles.  The sessions were well attended and feedback from presenters and participants was extremely positive.

Consultations with employee representatives on employment equity initiatives took place within the mandate of the NEB Union-Management Consultation Committee.

An online orientation course that includes an Employment Equity component was developed.

The services of an Ombudsperson were available to all employees to discuss harassment and discrimination issues.

The NEB Talent Management Framework (TMF) builds upon current practices to recruit, develop, and retain a pool of talent in order to meet current and future business objectives.  A key element within the framework is learning and development.  The current focus on leadership development brought about a renewal of the leadership competencies used at the NEB and shared across the organization. As well, a review of the Leadership development programs was initiated. This helps all employees prepare for leadership roles. 

Workforce Analysis

Availability Data

Comparison data for this report comes from the 2006 Census Data for Calgary, with the exception of Persons with Disabilities where the source is the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey which is based on national statistics.

Employee Population

The workforce analysis was conducted on the total employee population with the exception of those employees who work less than 12.5 hours/week.  In addition, the following persons were not included in the NEB workforce analysis:

  • Governor-in-Council appointments: Chair/CEO, Vice-Chair, and Board Members;
  • Persons who were brought into the NEB on Interchange from other Federal Government departments/agencies and private industry; or
  • Persons who worked for a period less than thirteen weeks.

Self-Identification

The Self-Identification initiative continues to be a mandatory process for all employees.  Mandatory information includes their name and signature, the other information is voluntary. 

Only those employees who voluntarily identify themselves as Aboriginal People, Visible Minorities or Persons with Disabilities are counted as members of designated groups for the purpose of conducting this workforce analysis and implementing Employment Equity.  Women were also included but identified using information provided by the NEB’s Human Resources Information System (HRIS). 

Analysis

Analysis of representation levels of designated groups within the Board was conducted and conclusions appear before each table.  It is important to note that, because of our small workforce, a change of one or two individuals within the designated group can change percentages dramatically.

Analysis of Total Employee Population

Employment Equity representation is determined by comparing the representation within an occupational category with its workforce availability.

An analysis of the total employee population was conducted; the results by gender and designated group members are shown in Table 1.

Table 1 shows that as of 31 March 2014, the total employee population was 420 employees, made up of 392 full-time and 28 part-time employees.Men comprised 39.5% of the total population, while Women had a representation of 60.5%, a slight increase from last year.  There was a decrease in Aboriginal People, Visible Minorities and Persons with Disabilities since last year.

Table 1 also shows the percentage of representation by designated groups compared with the labour market availability data.  From these comparisons, it can be seen that Women and Aboriginal People are represented at a higher rate at the NEB than the overall labour market and that Visible Minorities and Persons with Disabilities show slightly lower than the National availability.

The NEB workforce analysis shows these results:

Women: Exceeds workforce availability in this group (13.2 %).

Aboriginal:  Exceeds workforce availability in this group (2 %). 

Visible Minorities: Data indicates a slight shortage in this group. (- 6%).

Persons with Disabilities:  Data indicates a slight shortage in this group (-1.3 %).

Table 1: Comparison of Total Employee Population with Availability Data as of 31 March 2014

Table 1: Comparison of Total Employee Population with Availability Data as of 31 March 2014
Number of Employees Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons** with Disabilities
Full-Time 392 164 228 15 60 14
Part-Time 28 2 26 3 0 1
Totals 420 166 254 18 60 15
NEB Representation 39.5 % 60.5 % 4.3 % 14.3 % 3.6 %
2006 Census Availability Data* 52.7 % 47.3 % 2.3 % 20.3 % 4.9 %
NEB’s differential (over and under-represented) -13.2 % 13.2 % 2 % -6 % -1.3 %

* Labour Market Availability from 2006 Census Data

** Source: 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) and Employer's Internal Data

Analysis by Employment Equity Occupational Groups

Table 2 shows the breakdown into Employment Equity occupational groups of the total employee population by gender and designated groups.  For each occupational group, the representation by gender and designated group members is given in whole numbers, as well as a proportion of the total number of employees (the first percentage figure at the bottom of each cell). The availability data is the percentage figure that follows.

Senior Managers

Table 2 shows that as of 31 March 2014, there were 11 senior managers employed at the NEB.Of these, three were women, which, at 27.3 % is higher than the overall Calgary labour market availability data of 20.1 %.  There is no representation of Aboriginal People or Visible Minorities in this group.

The occupational groups for Senior Managers and Middle Managers were combined for Persons with Disabilities.  Total number of Persons with Disabilities within this group is 3.  This is higher than the overall Canadian labour market. 

Middle Managers

There was an increase from 26 to 30 middle managers (Directors) between 2013 and 2014; the representation of Women remained the same at 50 %.  Visible Minorities were under-represented (3.3 % vs 15.7 % availability)There continues to be no representation of Aboriginal People in this group.

Professionals

The Professional group is comprised of financial officers, engineers, economists, environmental specialists, human resources advisors, communications advisors, information systems specialists, translators and lawyers.In this occupational group, Women were well representedcompared with the availability data (55.4 % vs. 48.6 %) as were Aboriginal People (3.9 % vs. 1.3 %).  Visible Minorities were under represented (14 % vs. 18.8 % availability) as were Persons with Disabilities (1.9 % vs. 4.5 % availability).

Semi-Professionals and Technicians

The Semi-Professionals and Technicians occupational group includes geological technologists, engineering inspectors, library technicians, information technology service analysts and graphic designers. Three of the four groups are well represented in this group: Women (56.7 % vs. 50.9 %), Aboriginal People (6.7 % vs. 2.1 %), and Persons with Disabilities (10 % vs. 4.8 %).  There is an  under representation of Visible Minorities (10 % vs. 18.5 %).

Supervisors

There are four employees in this occupational group and 100% are women; no other representation is present in this group.

Administrative and Senior Clerical

Women made up the vast majority of the NEB’s complement in the Administrative and Senior Clerical occupational group, which includes Business Unit Administrators, Human Resources Assistants, and Assistants to Board Members and other senior level administrative staff.  There is a very slight shortage in Persons with Disabilities occupational group (2.4 % vs 2.6 %). Other equity groups are adequately represented.

Skilled Crafts and Trades

There was one employee in this occupational group therefore an analysis cannot be provided.

Clerical Personnel

This category includes records, mail clerks and general administrative assistants.  All equity groups were adequately represented in this category; Women (88.4 % vs. 74 %), Aboriginal People (9.3 % vs 2.4 %), Visible Minorities (20.9 % vs. 19.5 %) and Persons with Disabilities (7 % vs. 4.4 %). 

Semi-Skilled Workers

There were two employees in this occupational group therefore an analysis cannot be provided.

Summary

An analysis of occupational groups from an Employment Equity perspective demonstrates a commitment to Employment Equity, with opportunities for maintaining the level of excellence and increasing representation in some occupational groups for some categories. As per our Employment Equity and Diversity Plan, we are committed to ensuring our selection processes do not restrict participation of potential candidates.

Women were over-represented in all occupational groups in which an analysis was completed.  The majority of all Women employed at the NEB were found in the Professional (143), Clerical Personnel (38), and Administrative & Senior Clerical groups. 

Aboriginal People exceed the availability percentages in the Professionals, Semi-Professionals & Technicians, Administrative & Senior Clerical, and Clerical Personnel occupational groups. 

Visible Minorities exceed the availability percentages in the Administrative & Senior Clerical, and Clerical Personnel groups.  All other occupational groups show an under-representation compared to workforce availability.

Persons with Disabilities were well-represented in the Senior Managers/Middle Managers, Professionals, Semi-Professionals & Technicians, and Clerical Personnel groups in which an analysis was completed.  The other three groups show an under-representation compared to workforce availability. 

In order to increase representation in specific occupational groups, greater opportunities for upward mobility may need to be provided through leadership development, formal learning and access to internal developmental opportunities and coaching.

Table 2: Comparison of Employee Population with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups as of 31 March 2014

Table 2: Comparison of Employee Population with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups as of 31 March 2014
Occupational Group Total Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities **
Senior Managers 11 8 3 0 0 3**
NEB%-Census%   72.7 % : 79.9 % 27.3 % : 20.1 % 0 % : 0.9 % 0 % : 7.5 % 7.3 % : 3.2 %
Middle Managers 30 15 15 0 1 **
NEB%-Census%   50 % : 62.9 % 50 % : 37.1 % 0 % : 1.5 % 3.3 % : 15.7 % **
Professionals 258 115 143 10 36 5
NEB%-Census%   44.6 % : 51.4 % 55.4 % : 48.6 % 3.9 % : 1.3 % 14 % : 18.8 % 1.9 % : 4.5 %
Semi-Professionals & Technicians 30 13 17 2 3 3
NEB%-Census%   43.3 % : 49.1 % 56.7 % : 50.9 % 6.7 % : 2.1 % 10 % : 18.5 % 10 % : 4.8 %
Supervisors 4 0 4 0 0 0
NEB%-Census%   0 % : 44 % 100 % : 56 % 0 % : 2.6 % 0 % : 20.1 % 0 % : 9.5 %
Administrative & Senior Clerical 41 7 34 2 11 1
NEB%-Census%   17.1 % : 18.2 % 82.9 % : 81.8 % 4.9 % : 2.0 % 26.8 % : 12.4 % 2.4 % : 2.6 %
Skilled Crafts & Trades 1 1 0 0 0 0
NEB%-Census%   100 % : 94.4 % 0 % : 5.6 % 0 % : 3.5 % 0 % : 14.3 % 0 % : 5.3 %
Clerical Personnel 43 5 38 4 9 3
NEB%-Census%   11.6 % : 26 % 88.4 % : 74 % 9.3 % : 2.4 % 20.9 % : 19.5 % 7 % : 4.4 %
Semi-Skilled Workers 2 2 0 0 0 0
NEB%-Census%   100 % : 88.1 % 0 % : 11.8 % 0 % : 7.1 %  0 % : 4.0 %  0% : 5.5 %
Totals 420 166 254 18 60 15

* Labour Market Availability from 2006 Census Data

** Persons with Disabilities figures from 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) and Employer's Internal Data; and have combined Sr & Middle Managers data

Analysis of the Numbers of Employee Hires, Promotions and Regrettable Departures

Tables 3, 4 and 5 summarize new employee hires, promotions and regrettable departure activity between 01 April 2013 and 31 March 2014.

Employee Hires

Table 3 reports 52 employee hires, which is lower than the past reporting period.  Of those, 32 were Women and 13 were Visible Minorities.

Employee Promotions

Table 4 shows that 56 employees were promoted during this period, up from 51 last year.  The majority of actions (46) occurred in the Professionals Group of which 27 were Women.

Employee Regrettable Departures

Table 5 reports that in this period, 33 employees left the NEB.  Of these employees 18 were Women.  Departing employees were primarily in the Professional category (17).  This is not surprising considering Calgary’s labour market continues to remain very competitive, especially in the oil and gas industry which impacts the NEB’s attrition rate.

Summary

Analysis of hires, promotions and regrettable departures suggests that Women accounted for the greatest staff movements into, within, and out of the NEB. 

Three Aboriginal persons were promoted and two departed the NEB. 

Thirteen Visible Minorities were hired, nine were promoted and four departed. 

The inclusion of Landed Immigrants in the statistical data can be misleading for government departments and agencies, such as the NEB, that are regulated by the Public Service Employment Act and the Security of Information Act. External systemic barriers and the inability to facilitate security clearances from the country of origin for landed immigrants create barriers to the employment of some visible minorities.  Under the provisions of the Public Service Employment Act (PSEA), departments are required to provide Canadian Citizens with a preference for employment opportunities. Foreign educational documentation is not recognized and often difficult to verify, creating delays in potential employment for immigrants whose credentials do not meet Canadian standards, especially in hard to find skill sets such as specialty engineers, geo-physicists, etc.

There was one promotion and two regrettable departures from the Persons with Disabilities group.

Table 3: Comparison of Employee Hires with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups 01 April 2013 to 31 March 2014

Table 3: Comparison of Employee Hires with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups 01 April 2013 to 31 March 2014
Occupational Group Total Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities **
Senior Managers 0 0 0 0 0 0**
NEB% : Census%   0 % : 79.9 % 0 % : 20.1 % 0 % : 0.9 % 0 % : 7.5 % 0 % : 3.2 %
Middle Managers 1 1 0 0 0 0**
NEB% : Census% 100 % : 62.9 % 0 % : 37.1 % 0 % : 1.5 % 0 % : 15.7 % 0% : 3.2 %
Professionals 25 12 13 0 3 0
NEB% : Census% 48 % : 51.4 % 52 % : 48.6 % 0 % : 1.3 % 12 % : 18.8 % 0 % : 4.5 %
Semi-Professionals & Technicians 2 1 1 0 0 0
NEB% : Census% 50 % : 49.1 % 50 % : 50.9 % 0 % : 2.1 % 0 % : 18.5 % 0 %: 4.8 %
Supervisors 0 0 0 0 0 0
NEB% : Census% 0 % : 44 % 0 % : 56 % 0 % : 2.6 % 0 % : 20.1 % 0 % : 9.5 %
Administrative & Senior Clerical 16 4 12 0 5 0
NEB% : Census% 25 % : 18.2 % 75 % : 81.8 % 0 % : 2.0 % 31 % : 12.4 % 0 % : 2.6 %
Skilled Crafts & Trades 0 0 0 0 0 0
NEB% : Census% 0 % : 94.4 % 0 % : 5.6 % 0 % : 3.5 % 0% : 14.3 % 0 % : 5.3 %
Clerical Personnel 7 1 6 0 5 0
NEB% : Census% 14.3 % : 26 % 85.7 % : 74 % 0 % : 2.4 % 71.4 % : 19.5 % 0 % : 4.4 %
Semi-Skilled Workers 1 1 0 0 0 0
NEB% : Census% 100 % : 88.2 % 0 % : 11.8 % 0 % : 7.1 % 0 % : 4.0 % 0 % : 5.5 %
Totals 52 20 32 0 13 0

* Labour Market availability from 2006 Census Data

** Senior Managers and Middle Managers combined for Persons with Disabilities.

Table 4: Employee Promotions by Employment Equity Groups* and by Occupational Groups 01 April 2013 to 31 March 2014

Table 4: Employee Promotions by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups 01 April 2013 to 31 March 2014
Occupational Group Total Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
 Senior Managers 0 0 0 0 0 0
Middle & Other Managers 4 2 2 0 0 0
Professionals 46 19 27 3 9 1
Semi-Professionals and Technicians 2 0 2 0 0 0
Administrative & Senior Clerical Personnel 3 1 2 0 0 0
Clerical Personnel 1 0 1 0 0 0
Supervisors 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 56 22 34 3 9 1
* These occupational categories reflect the 2011 NOC Codes.

Table 5: Employee Regrettable Departures[1] by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups 01 April 2013 to 31 March 2014

Table 5: Employee Regrettable Departures by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups 01 April 2013 to 31 March 2014
Occupational Group Total Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
Senior & Middle Managers 4 4 0 0 1 0
Professionals 17 8 9 0 2 1
Administrative & Senior Clerical Personnel 3 1 2 0 0 0
Clerical Personnel 6 1 5 1 1 0
Semi-Professional and Technicians 3 1 2 1 0 1
Totals 33 15 18 2 4 2
[1] Regrettable departures: all separations from the NEB, including retirements.

Workplace Equity Information Management System - National Energy Board

Workforce Analysis - Summary Report

Date: 2014-03-31

Women

Workforce Availability Estimates for Women
Employment Equity Occupational Group All Employees Representation Availability Gap
  # # % % # #
01: Senior Managers 11 * 27.3 % 20.1 %  2 1
02: Middle and Other Managers 30 15 50.0 % 37.1 % 11 4
03: Professionals 258 143 55.4 % 48.6 % 125 18
04: Semi-Professionals and Technicians 30 17 56.7 % 50.9% 15 2
07: Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 41 34 82.9 % 81.8 % 34 0
05: Supervisors 4 4 100.0 % 56 % 2 2
09: Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 1 0 0.0 % 5.6 % 1 -1
10: Clerical Personnel 43 38 88.4 % 74 % 32 6
12: Semi-Skilled Manual Worker 2 0 0.0 % 11.8 % 0 2
Total 420 254 60.5 % 53 % 222 34

Total may not equal sum of components due to rounding.

Source: 2006 Census of Calgary and Employer's Internal Data

* 3 or less, number too small for confidential purposes.

Aboriginal Peoples

Workforce Availability Estimates for Aboriginal Peoples
Employment Equity Occupational Group All Employees Representation Availability Gap
  # # % % # #
01: Senior Managers 11 0 0.0 % 0.9 % 0 0
02: Middle and Other Managers 30 0 0.0 % 1.5 % 0 0
03: Professionals 258 10  3.9 %  1.3 % 3 7
04: Semi-Professionals and Technicians 30 * 6.7 % 2.1 % 1 1
05: Supervisors 4 0 0.0 % 2.6 % 0 0
07: Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 41 * 4.9 % 2.0 % 1 1
09: Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 1 0 0.0 % 3.5 % 0 0
10: Clerical Personnel 43 4 9.3 % 2.4 % 0 4
12: Semi-Skilled Manual Worker 2 0 0.0 % 7.1 % 0 0
Total 420 18 4.3 % 1 % 5 14

Total may not equal sum of components due to rounding.

Source: 2006 Census of Calgary and Employer's Internal Data

* 3 or less, number too small for confidential purposes.

Members of Visible Minorities

Workforce Availability Estimates for Visible Minorities
Employment Equity Occupational Group All Employees Representation Availability Gap
  # # % % # #
01: Senior Managers 11 0  0.0 % 7.5 % 1 -1
02: Middle and Other Managers 30 * 3.3 % 15.7 % 5 -4
03: Professionals 258  36 14.0 %  18.8 % 49 -13
04: Semi-Professionals and Technicians 30 * 10.0 % 18.5 % 6 -3
05: Supervisors 4 0 0.0 % 20.1 % 1 -1
07: Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 41 11 26.8 % 12.4 % 5 6
09: Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 1 0 0.0 % 14.3 %  0 0
10: Clerical Personnel 43 9 20.9 % 19.5 % 8 1
12: Semi-Skilled Manual Worker 2 0 0.0 % 4.0 %  0 0
Total 420 60 8.3 % 18 % 75 -15

Total may not equal sum of components due to rounding.

Source: 2006 Census of Calgary and Employer's Internal Data

* 3 or less, number too small for confidential purposes.

Persons with Disabilities

Workforce Availability Estimates Persons with Disabilities
Employment Equity Occupational Group All Employees Representation Availability Gap
  # # % % # #
01/02: Senior Managers/Middle Managers 41 * 7.3 % 3.2 % 1 2
03: Professionals 30 5 1.9 % 4.5 % 1 4
04: Semi-Professionals and Technicians 258 * 10.0% 4.8 % 12 -9
05: Supervisors 30 0 0.0 % 9.5 % 3 -3
07: Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 4 * 2.4 % 2.6 % 0 1
09: Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 1 0 0.0 % 5.3 % 0 0
10: Clerical Personnel 43 * 7.0 % 4.4 % 2 1
12: Semi-Skilled Manual Worker 2 0 0.0 % 5.5 % 0 0
Total 420 15 3.1 % 5 % 19 -6

Total may not equal sum of components due to rounding.

Source: 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) and Employer's Internal Data

** Persons with Disabilities figures from 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) and Employer's Internal Data; and have combined Senior & Middle Managers data

* 3 or less, number too small for confidential purposes.

Conclusion

The NEB workforce exceeds representation in two groups: Women and Aboriginal People.  There is a slight under-representation within the Visible Minorities and Persons with Disabilities groups.  As the NEB has a small workforce, a change of one or two individuals can make a significant impact to the statistics.

The NEB remains committed to promoting diversity within the workforce and improve our representation in the various groups. We continue to take into consideration our employment equity needs in most staffing actions. 

As part of our attraction and retention strategy for all employees, the NEB is committed to building a workplace that embraces inclusiveness and diversity.  As documented in the NEB People Strategy, retention is an integrated approach to human resources management. Our Talent Management Framework is designed to support the development of all our employees. 

The NEB continues to improve our outreach efforts to increase the representation of Visible Minorities and Persons with Disabilities in those occupational groups where they are not well represented. Although the NEB’s representation of Aboriginal People reflects well against the availability data, we will continue to network with representatives of both secondary and post-secondary institutions that have responsibility for Aboriginal learners and liaise with Workforce Diversity Consultants in other government organizations to share inventories of available Aboriginal applicants. 

Labour market availability for the Visible Minority group has increased with the inclusion of Landed Immigrants in Census data.  This adjustment represents an increase in the representation target for the NEB.

We continue to build on our three year employment equity plan as the initiatives grow and evolve.

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