Canada’s Renewable Power Landscape 2017 – Energy Market Analysis

Aerial view of Niagara Falls on a sunny, clear day

Ontario

In 2016, Ontario generated 33.4% of its electricity from renewable sources and generated 91.7% of its electricity from sources that are non-emitting during operation. Oil and diesel were 0.1% of Ontario’s generation in 2016. Natural gas was the only significant fossil fuel source of electricity, accounting for 8.2% of the electricity generated in 2016.

Generation Trends

Ontario generated 58.3% of its electricity from 18 of Canada’s 19 CANDU nuclear reactors. (The remaining reactor is in New Brunswick.) Coal, Ontario’s third largest source of electricity in 2005, was phased out completely in 2014, and replaced with increased nuclear, wind, solar and natural gas generation.

In 2016, hydro was Ontario’s second largest source of electricity. Hydro has accounted for an average of 23.1% of generation since 2005. Non-hydro renewables experienced strong growth under the feed-in-tariff program, an incentive implemented in 2006. Wind, solar, and biomass increased from 0.7% in 2005 to 10.8% combined in 2016. Ontario produced the most wind and solar electricity of any province or territory in 2016, at 12 123 GW.h and 3 566 GW.h, respectively.

Capacity Changes in 2016

Ontario added an estimated 932 MW of capacity in 2016, all from renewable sources. As much new capacity came from wind as from all other sources combined. The Armow, and Grand Bend wind projects were the largest capacity additions at 180 MW and 100 MW respectively.

More Information

Canada’s Renewable Power Landscape 2016 – Energy Market Analysis provides additional information on renewable power in Ontario

FIGURE 15 Electricity Generation by Source in Ontario

Figure 15
Description

This graph shows the composition of Ontario’s electricity generation between 2005 and 2016. On average, hydro accounted for 23.1% of generation. Wind’s share grew from zero to 7.8%, solar from zero to 2.3%, and biomass remained at 0.7%. Nuclear grew from 49.6% to 58.3% of generation. Coal decreased from 18.7% in 2005 to 0% in 2014. Natural gas peaked at 16.1% in 2011 before falling to 8.2% in 2016.

TABLE 6 Electric Capacity and Generation in Ontario

  Capacity in MW and % Generation in GW.h and %
  2005 2015 2016 2005 2015 2016
Oil and Diesel 116 250 250 184 237 109
0.4% 0.6% 0.6% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1%
Natural Gas 4 789 9 648 9 630 13 082 19 403 12 859
15.2% 24.5% 23.9% 8.3% 12.1% 8.2%
Coal 6 437 0 0 29 431 0 0
20.4% 0.0% 0.0% 18.7% 0.0% 0.0%
Nuclear 11 450 13 568 13 568 77 969 91 405 90 873
36.3% 34.5% 33.7% 49.6% 57.0% 58.3%
Solar 17 2 119 2 291 0 3 001 3 566
0.1% 5.4% 5.7% 0.0% 1.9% 2.3%
Biomass 209 574 762 1 108 818 1 128
0.7% 1.5% 1.9% 0.7% 0.5% 0.7%
Wind 15 4 374 4 841 26 10 200 12 123
<0.1% 11.1% 12.0% <0.1% 6.4% 7.8%
Hydro 8 505 8 768 8 872 35 480 35 359 35 288
27.0% 22.3% 22.1% 22.6% 22.0% 22.6%
All renewable sources 8 745 15 835 16 767 36 614 49 378 52 105
27.7% 40.3% 41.7% 23.3% 30.8% 33.4%
All sources 31 538 39 302 40 215 157 280 160 422 155 946

Residential Bills and Greenhouse Gas Generation Intensity

Ontario’s largest city, Toronto, has a relatively high residential electricity bill of $178 for 1 000 kW.h compared to the Canadian mean of $129 per 1 000 kW.h. Ontario’s GHG generation intensity is relatively low, emitting 40 grams of GHGs per kW.h compared to the Canadian mean of 140 g GHG/kW.h.

FIGURE 16

FIGURE 16

Source and Description

Source:
Hydro-Québec, National Inventory Report

Description:
Two dials indicate the monthly residential electricity bill for 1 000 kW.h and the GHG generation intensity in grams of GHG per kW.h. Ontario’s largest city, Toronto, has a relatively high residential electricity bill of $178 for 1 000 kW.h compared to the Canadian mean of $129 per 1 000 kW.h. Ontario’s GHG generation intensity is relatively low, emitting 40 grams of GHGs per kW.h compared to the mean of 140 g GHG/kW.h.

 

 

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