Canada’s Renewable Power Landscape 2017 – Energy Market Analysis

A gravel road cuts through canola fields and a farmstead in the distance

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan decreased its generation from coal by 6.5% in just one year. It generated 49.3% of its total electricity from coal in 2016, down from 54.8% in 2015. Natural gas increased its share from 27.7% to 33.7%. Renewables accounted for 17.1% of total generation in 2016.

Generation Trends

Fossil fuels are the primary source of Saskatchewan’s electricity due to a relative abundance of coal and natural gas. Coal remains the largest source of generation, but declined from 67.0% to 49.3% between 2005 and 2016. Natural gas generation increased more than four-fold over the same period, due to both lower natural gas prices and a shift towards less GHG–intensive generation.

From 2005 to 2016, hydro generation in Saskatchewan fluctuated between 23.2% and 13.4% of total electricity generation. These fluctuations were primarily due to varying annual precipitation and corresponding river flow levels.

Wind, the only non-hydro renewable in Saskatchewan, grew from 0.5% to 3.0% between 2005 and 2016. Saskatchewan is one of the sunniest provinces in Canada; however, they have no utility-scale solar facilities as of 2016.

Capacity Changes in 2016

Saskatchewan added an estimated 150 MW of natural gas-fired capacity, primarily from upgrades to the Queen Elizabeth Power Station.

More Information

Canada’s Renewable Power Landscape 2016 – Energy Market Analysis provides additional information on renewable power in Saskatchewan.

FIGURE 11 Electricity Generation by Source in Saskatchewan

Figure 11
Description

This graph shows the composition of Saskatchewan’s electricity generation between 2005 and 2016. Hydro’s share fluctuated between 13.4% and 23.2% of generation. Wind averaged 2.7%. Coal decreased from 67.0% in 2005 to 49.3% in 2016. Natural gas’ share increased from 9.3% in 2005 to 33.7% in 2016.

TABLE 4 Electric Capacity and Generation in Saskatchewan

  Capacity in MW and % Generation in GW.h and %
  2005 2015 2016 2005 2015 2016
Oil and Diesel 1 17 17 18 16 0
<0.1% 0.4% 0.4% 0.1% 0.1% <0.1%
Natural Gas 1 053 1 710 1 860 1 827 6 498 8 221
28.2% 39.1% 40.8% 9.3% 27.7% 33.7%
Coal 1 799 1 535 1 535 13 227 12 871 12 040
48.2% 35.1% 33.6% 67.0% 54.8% 49.3%
Biomass 0 2 36 0 0 152
0.0% <0.1% 0.8% 0.0% 0.0% 0.6%
Wind 16 221 221 92 684 730
0.4% 5.1% 4.8% 0.5% 2.9% 3.0%
Hydro 864 889 889 4 573 3 425 3 285
23.1% 20.3% 19.5% 23.2% 14.6% 13.4%
All renewable sources 880 1 112 1 146 4 665 4 109 4 167
23.6% 25.4% 25.1% 23.6% 17.5% 17.1%
All sources 3 733 4 374 4 558 19 737 23 494 24 428

Residential Bills and Greenhouse Gas Generation Intensity

Saskatchewan’s capital city, Regina, has a residential electricity bill of $146 for 1 000 kW.h which is slightly higher than the Canadian mean of $129 per 1 000 kW.h. Saskatchewan’s GHG generation intensity is almost five times higher than average in Canada, emitting 660 grams of GHGs per kW.h compared to the Canadian mean of 140 g GHG/kW.h.

FIGURE 12

FIGURE 12

Source and Description

Source:
Hydro-Québec, National Inventory Report

Description:
Two dials indicate the monthly residential electricity bill for 1 000 kW.h and the GHG generation intensity in grams of GHG per kW.h. Saskatchewan’s capital city, Regina, has a residential electricity bill of $146 for 1 000 kW.h, which is slightly higher than the Canadian mean of $129 per 1 000 kW.h. Saskatchewan’s GHG generation intensity is almost five times higher than the average in Canada, emitting 660 grams of GHGs per kW.h compared to the mean of 140 g GHG/kW.h.

 

 

Date modified: