ARCHIVED – 2014 Natural Gas Exports and Imports Summary

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Table 1: Summary of Trade

Table 1: Summary of Trade
  2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Volumes (Billion m³)Note a
Exports 91.9 90.4 86.8 80.9 76.3
Imports (Pipeline + LNG) 22.8 31.5 31.2 26.6 21.9
Net ExportsNote b 69.0 58.9 55.6 54.3 54.4
Volumes (Bcf/d)Note c
Exports 8.9 8.7 8.4 7.8 7.4
Imports (Pipeline + LNG) 2.2 3.0 3.0 2.6 2.1
Net Exports 6.7 5.7 5.4 5.3 5.3
PriceNote d ($/GJ)Note e
Exports 4.29 3.81 2.63 3.60 5.33
Imports (Pipeline + LNG) 4.56 4.03 2.89 3.95 6.41
ValueNote d ($ billions)
Exports 15.1 13.1 8.7 11.2 15.7
Imports (Pipeline + LNG) 3.9 4.8 3.4 4.0 5.4
Net Values 11.1 8.3 5.3 7.1 10.3

Sources: NEB Commodity Tracking System Statistics as of 20 May 2015: Gas - Monthly Summary for Year (Exports and Imports); Gas & LNG - Month & YTD Summary by Port (Imports); LNG - Shipment Details (Imports); Gas - Historical Summary of Volumes and Prices (Exports and Imports).

Export and Import Volumes

Net Exports

  • Figure 1 shows net export volumes increased from 54.3 billion m³ (5.25 Bcf/d) in 2013 to 54.4 billion m  (5.26 Bcf/d) in 2014. This represents an increase of 0.2 per cent.

Figure 1: Monthly Natural Gas Trade Volumes

Figure 1: Monthly Natural Gas Trade Volumes

Sources: NEB Commodity Tracking System Statistics as of 20 May 2015: Gas - Monthly Summary for Year (Exports and Imports); Gas & LNG - Month & YTD Summary by Port (Exports and Imports); and Shipment Details (Imports)

Exports

  • Figure 1 shows that in 2014, natural gas exports decreased by 6 per cent, from 80.9 billion m³ (7.82 Bcf/d) in 2013 to 76.3 billion m³ (7.38 Bcf/d), a difference of 4.6 billion m³ (0.44 Bcf/d). Nearly 100 per cent (i.e. over 99 per cent) of Canadian natural gas exports were sent by pipeline to the U.S.Footnote 1 However, there continued to be LNG and compressed natural gas (CNG) exported by truck to the U.S, but these volumes are too small to be represented in Figure 1.

Imports

  • In 2014, the volume of natural gas imports decreased by 18 per cent, from 26.6 billion m³ (2.57 Bcf/d) in 2013 to 21.9 billion m³ (2.12 Bcf/d).
  • 21.4 billion m³ (2.07 Bcf/d), or 97 per cent, of natural gas imports, were imported into Canada by pipeline from the U.S., and approximately 0.5 billion m³ (0.05 Bcf/d), or 3 per cent of total imports, were imported as LNG.Footnote 2 Since very little CNG was imported, the volumes are not shown in Figure 1.

Pipeline Imports

  • In 2014, 21.1 billion m³ (2.04 Bcf/d), or 99 per cent, of Canadian pipeline imports flowed from the U.S. into Ontario. In comparison, in 2013, 24.3 billion m³ (2.35 Bcf/d) of Canadian pipeline imports flowed from the U.S. into Ontario.Footnote 3

LNG Imports

  • Nearly 100 per cent of LNG imports came from Trinidad and TobagoFootnote 4, and only a small portion of LNG is imported from the U.S. by truck. The combined LNG import volumes, by marine vessel and truck, are shown in Figures 1 and 2.

Figure 2: Monthly Natural Gas Trade Volumes

Figure 2: Monthly Natural Gas Trade Volumes

Sources: NEB Commodity Tracking System Statistics as of 20 May 2015; Gas - Monthly Summary for Year (Exports and Imports); Gas & LNG - Month & YTD Summary by Port (Exports and Imports); and LNG - Shipment Details (Imports)

Regional Pipeline Export Volumes

Figure 3 shows Canadian pipeline exports to the West, Midwest and East regions of the U.S.

  • In 2014, natural gas exports to the U.S. Midwest decreased by 7 per cent, from 43.1 billion m³ (4.17 Bcf/d) in 2013 to 40.3 billion m³ (3.90 Bcf/d) in 2014.
  • Exports to the U.S. West decreased by 5 per cent, from 27.4 billion m³ (2.65 Bcf/d) in 2013 to 26.1 billion m³ (2.53 Bcf/d) in 2014.
  • Exports to the U.S. East decreased by 5 per cent, from 10.3 billion m³ (1.00 Bcf/d) in 2013 to 9.9 billion m³ (0.96 Bcf/d) in 2014.

Figure 3: Historical Pipeline Export Volumes by Region

Figure 3: Historical Pipeline Export Volumes by Region

Sources: NEB Commodity Tracking System Statistics as of 20 May 2015; Gas - Historical Summary by Region (Exports)

  • Figure 4 shows that natural gas exports to the U.S. were generally lower on a month to month comparison between 2014 and 2013, with the exception of some winter months.

Figure 4: Export Volumes by Region

Figure 4: Export Volumes by Region

Source: NEB Commodity Tracking System Statistics as of 20 May 2015; Gas - Historical Summary by Region (Exports)

Values and Prices

Exports (numbers may not sum due to rounding)

  • The gross export value of natural gas in 2014 increased by 41 per cent, from $11.2 billion (approximately USD $10.8 billion) in 2013 to $15.7 billion (approximately USD $14.2 billion) in 2014 (Figure 6).
  • The average export price in 2014 increased by 48 per cent, from $3.60 per GJ (approximately USD $3.69 per MMBtu) in 2013 to $5.33 per GJ (approximately USD $5.09 per MMBtu).

Figure 5: Annual Natural Gas Trade Values and Prices

Figure 5: Annual Natural Gas Trade Values and Prices

Source: NEB Commodity Tracking System Statistics as of 20 May 2015; Gas - Historical Summary of Volumes and Prices (Exports and Imports)

Imports (numbers may not sum due to rounding)

  • The gross import value of natural gas (including LNG) in 2014 increased by 34 per cent, from $4.0 billion (approximately USD $3.9 billion) in 2013 to $5.4 billion (approximately USD $4.9 billion) in 2014.
  • The average combined import price (including LNG) in 2014 increased by 62 per cent, from $3.95 per GJ (USD $4.06 per MMBtu) in 2013 to $6.41 per GJ (USD $6.12 per MMBtu) in 2014.

Figure 6: Monthly Natural Gas Trade Values and Prices

Figure 6: Monthly Natural Gas Trade Values and Prices

Source: NEB Commodity Tracking System Statistics as of 20 May 2015; Gas - Historical Summary of Volumes and Prices (Exports and Imports)

Export Volumes by Long Term or Short Term Authorizations

  • Figure 7 shows the two types of regulatory instruments used to export natural gas: short term orders and long term licences. (All exports of natural gas must be authorized by a long term licence or a short term order.)
  • Since 2012, nearly 100 per cent of the naturalgas exported from Canada has been shipped against short-term export orders, which authorize exports for terms of two years or less. Short term export orders do not restrict the export volumes flowing from Canada to the U.S.
  • Overall, the use of long term licences, that authorize exports for terms longer than two years, has declined significantly since market determined pricing was introduced in 1985.
  • Long term export licences were historically sought to underpin pipeline infrastructure projects. Once infrastructure was developed, exporters did not return to renew licences; they sought short term orders.

Figure 7: 2014 Historical Natural Gas Export Volumes by Authorization Type

Figure 7: 2014 Historical Natural Gas Export Volumes by Authorization Type

Source: NEB Commodity Tracking System Statistics as of 20 May 2015; ; Gas - Historical Summary by Term

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