Safety Performance Portal - September 2015

The safety of Canadians and protection of the environment in the construction, operation and abandonment of pipeline facilities regulated by the NEB are the Board’s top priorities, and have been a part of our mandate since 1959. We hold those we regulate accountable so that the safety of Canadians and the environment is protected.

In 2013, the NEB regulated approximately 73,000[1] kilometres of interprovincial and international pipelines. See a map of the NEB’s regulated pipelines. The safety and environmental performance data and information that follows relates to the NEB’s regulated pipelines.

[1] Total kms include pipeline that is approved, under construction, operational, deactivated, decommissioned, and pending abandonment.

Pipeline Incidents

Under the National Energy Board Onshore Pipeline Regulations (OPR), companies must immediately notify the National Energy Board (NEB) of any incident that relates to the construction, operation or abandonment of a pipeline.

Incident means an occurrence that results in:

  • the death of or serious injury to a person;
  • a significant adverse effect on the environment (referred to below as significant adverse effects);
  • an unintended fire or explosion;
  • an unintended or uncontained release of low vapour pressure hydrocarbons (referred to below as Liquid releases) in excess of 1.5 m³;
  • an unintended or uncontrolled release of gas or high vapour pressure hydrocarbons (referred to below as Gas releases); and,
  • the operation of a pipeline beyond its design limits (OBDL).

To enhance the analysis of the reportable incident data, the NEB has separated serious injuries incidents from fatalities, and unintended fires from unintended explosions.

See a map of reportable OPR incidents (2008 - present)
map of reportable OPR indicents

Dashboard

Figure 1: Total Number of Events Resulting in Reportable Incidents 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015

Figure 1: Total Number of Events Resulting in Reportable Incidents 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Figure 1: Details
  • Figure 1 shows the number of events which occurred from 2008 through to 30 September 2015 that resulted in a reportable incident (or incidents).
  • For the first nine months of 2015, there were 64 events reported under the OPR; 62 events had a single reportable incident and two events had multiple reportable incidents.
  • An event resulting in both a fire and a serious injury is an example of an event with multiple reportable incidents. Figure 2 breaks out each of these incident types by year.
Table 1: Total Number of Events Resulting in Reportable Incidents 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Year Single Reportable Incident Event Multiple Reportable Incident Event Total Events
2008 50 0 50
2009 73 5 78
2010 108 2 110
2011 97 2 99
2012 150 5 155
2013 117 4 121
2014 72 1 73
Jan-Sep 2015 62 2 64

Figure 2: Number of Incidents by Type, 14 vs. Jan-Sep 2015

Figure 2: Number of Incidents by Type, 14 vs. Jan-Sep 2015
Figure 2: Details
  • Figure 2 compares the number of reportable incidents by type in 2014 with the number of reportable incidents for January – September 2015. Subsequent figures provide information on the different incident types.
  • Most reportable incidents do not result in threats to the safety of people or the environment.
Table 2: Number of Incidents by Type, 14 vs. Jan-Sep 2015
Year Gas Releases Fires Explosions Serious Injuries Significant Adverse Effects Fatalities Liquid Releases OBDL
2012 71 35 7 9 0 0 2 37
2013 55 15 0 2 0 1 10 42
2014 43 16 0 2 2 0 7 4
Jan-Sep 2015 33 13 3 2 0 0 3 10

Figure 3: Number of Serious Injuries 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015

Figure 3: Number of Serious Injuries 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Figure 3: Details
  • There were two serious injuries in the first nine months of 2015. The first injury occurred when a worker was clearing an access road and slipped, which resulted in a broken forearm. The second injury occurred when a subcontractor was driving to a work site and was in an accident with a train at a level crossing. The driver and passenger of the vehicle sustained bruising and cuts.
Table 3: Figure 3: Number of Serious Injuries 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Year Serious Injuries
2008 3
2009 5
2010 1
2011 1
2012 9
2013 2
2014 2
Jan-Sep 2015 2

Figure 4: Number of Fatalities, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015

Figure 4: Number of Fatalities, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Figure 4: Details
  • There were no fatalities in the first nine months of 2015.
Table 4: Number of Fatalities, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Year Fatalities
2008 2
2009 0
2010 0
2011 3
2012 0
2013 1
2014 0
Jan-Sep 2015 0

Figure 5: Number of Operation Beyond Design Limits (OBDL) Incidents, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015

Figure 5: Number of Operation Beyond Design Limits (OBDL) Incidents, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Figure 5: Details
  • There have been ten incidents related to OBDL in 2015, as follows:
    • Two were related to the testing of newly installed equipment at a station, which caused the pipelines to shut down and lead to an over-pressure in nearby meter stations;
    • Three involved over-pressure that occurred when thermal expansion caused an increase in pressure in the pipeline, and either the thermal relief valve failed to open, or the relief valve didn’t relieve the pressure quickly enough to avoid exceeding the line’s limits;
    • Two involved an outage at a compressor station which resulted in an overpressure in the line;
    • One occurred during maintenance work when expansion joints on an exhaust duct failed;
    • One involved off-specification gas entering a meter station due to an error upstream; and,
    • One occurred when a pipeline was started against a closed valve and the relief valve failed to open, setting off an alarm in the Control Centre. 
Table 5: Number of Operation Beyond Design Limits (OBDL) Incidents, 2008 - Jan-Jun 201
Year Total
2008 0
2009 5
2010 25
2011 6
2012 37
2013 42
2014 4
Jan-Sep 2015 10

Figure 6: Number of Fires and Explosions, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015

Figure 6: Number of Fires and Explosions, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Figure 6: Details
  • Thirteen fires and three explosions have been reported in 2015, as follows:
    • Six fires occurred during welding/cutting work;
    • Three electrical fires occurred in equipment, and these fires were contained within the equipment’s electrical housing;
    • One fire occurred when a machine was started in an area where a vent line was expelling fumes;
    • One fire was noticed coming from a booster vent;
    • One grass fire occurred when a third party struck a power pole near a right of way;
    • One fire occurred in the pump and hose of a vacuum truck which was pulling vapours away from a barrel; and,
    • Of the three explosions, two occurred in electrical equipment and one occurred in the exhaust of a boiler system.
Table 6: Number of Fires and Explosions, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Year Fire Explosion
2008 9 0
2009 14 2
2010 13 1
2011 22 0
2012 35 7
2013 15 0
2014 16 0
Jan-Sep 2015 13 3

Figure 7: Total Volumes of Liquids Released Vs. Number of Liquid Releases, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015

Figure 7: Total Volumes of Liquids Released Vs. Number of Liquid Releases, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Figure 7: Details
  • In the first nine months of 2015, three reportable liquid release occurred as follows:
    • A leak overflowed the secondary containment around a valve and spilled 1.5 m3 of crude oil which did not leave company property;
    • A leak from a pump spilled 2.0 m3 of lube oil which did not leave company property; and,
    • A leak totaling 16.0 m3 of crude oil occurred from a booster pump. Of this volume, 15.0 m3 was contained by the secondary containment around the pump, and 1.0 m3 spilled onto adjacent soil affecting an area of 10m x 10m. Vacuum trucks were used to assist with the clean-up and restoration of the site.
Table 7: Total Volumes of Liquids Released Vs. Number of Liquid Releases, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Year Total Volume Released (m³) # of Releases
2008 188.4 9
2009 495.05 7
2010 337.60 7
2011 284.60 6
2012 97.44 2
2013 58.34 10
2014 234.85 7
Jan-Sep 2015 19.5 3

Figure 7(a): On/Off Company Property Liquid Releases by Location, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015

Figure 7(a): On/Off Company Property Liquid Releases by Location, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Figure 7(a): Details
  • Between 2008 and September 2015, there have been a total of five liquid releases off company property. 
  • Two of the three liquid releases which were reported in the first nine months of 2015 were entirely contained within company property. 
Table 7(a): On/Off Company Property Liquid Releases by Location, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
On Company Property Off Company Property
46 5

Figure 8: Number of Natural Gas and Other High Vapour Pressure Releases, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015

Figure 8: Number of Natural Gas and Other High Vapour Pressure Releases, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Figure 8: Details
  • There were 33 reportable natural gas and other high vapour pressure releases in the first nine months of 2015. Of these, 23 were sweet natural gas, five were natural gas liquids, two were sour natural gas, one was mixed high vapour pressure hydrocarbons, one was propane and one was fuel gas.
Table 8: Number of Natural Gas and Other High Vapour Pressure Releases, 2008 - Jan-Sep 2015
Year Total
2008 24
2009 51
2010 63
2011 63
2012 71
2013 55
2014 43
Jan-Sep 2015 33

Please note that ruptures are a type of unintended or uncontrolled liquid or gas release incident. For more detailed information on ruptures, please refer to the Pipeline Ruptures section of the NEB’s website.

Unauthorized Activities

Figure 9: Number of UAs by Province, 2014 - Jan-Sep 2015

Figure 9: Number of UAs by Province, 2014 - Jan-Sep 2015
Figure 9: Details
  • There have been 117 UAs reported in the first nine months of 2015.
Table 9: Number of UAs by Province, 2014 - Jan-Sep 2015
Province 2014 2015
Alberta 29 28
British Columbia 60 42
Manitoba 5 3
New Brunswick 0 4
Nova Scotia 1 0
Ontario 19 29
Quebec 17 8
Saskatchewan 7 3

Figure 10: Number of UAs by Type, 2010 - Jan-Sep 2015

Figure 10: Number of UAs by Type, 2010 - Jan-Sep 2015
Figure 10: Details
  • The data so far in 2015 shows that ground disturbance continues to be the most prevalent type of UA.
Table 10: Number of UAs by Type, 2010 - Jan-Sep 2015
  2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Jan-Sep 2015
Ground Disturbance 81 60 110 108 113 73
Encroachment 12 6 11 10 12 35
Vehicle Crossing 6 3 10 9 13 10

Figure 11: Number of UAs by Violator Type, 2010 - Jan-Sep 2015

Figure 11: Number of UAs by Violator Type, 2010 - Jan-Sep 2015
Figure 11: Details
  • This graph is based on data from a new system. The unknown violator type is high in 2014 because the process of categorizing the data in the new system is ongoing. Consistent with trends from 2010 through 2014, of the known violator types, contractors continue to be the leading type of violator so far in 2015, followed by landowners and municipalities.
Table 11: Number of UAs by Violator Type, 2010 - Jan-Sep 2015
  2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Jan-Sep 2015
Contractor 58 37 68 80 24 67
Landowner 36 21 47 36 11 32
Municipality 4 11 14 10 3 3
Unknown 1 0 2 1 99 8

Figure 12: Number of UAs by First-Time Vs. Repeat Violators, 2010 - Jan-Sep 2015

Figure 12: Number of UAs by First-Time Vs. Repeat Violators, 2010 - Jan-Sep 2015
Figure 12: Details
  • The trend in the number of first-time vs. repeat violators continued in the first nine months of 2015, with more first-time violators than repeat violators.
Table 12: Number of UAs by First-Time Vs. Repeat Violators, 2010 - Jan-Jun 201
  2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Jan-Sep 2015
First Time 89 62 109 112 107 102
Repeat 10 7 22 15 30 16

Please note: The incident data shown represents a single point in time. As investigations are completed for open incidents, or as new information becomes available, the incident record is updated and may change certain aspects of the incident record including whether the incident remains reportable under the applicable regulations. Accordingly, the incident data shown is subject to change.

Your comments on the information presented on the Safety and Environmental Performance Dashboard are important to us. Please send any feedback on the content of this page to: dashboard@neb-one-gc.ca. For inquiries, reports or requests on this content, please refer to the NEB’s Contact Us page.

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