2017 Natural Gas Exports and Imports Summary

Table 1: Summary of Trade

Table 1: Summary of Trade
  2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
Volumes (Billion m³)
Pipeline Exports 80.9 76.3 76.0 84.2 85.2
Pipeline Imports 25.5 21.4 19.2 21.9 24.9
Net Pipeline ExportsTable Note a 55.3 54.9 56.8 62.3 60.3
Volumes (Bcf/d)
Pipeline Exports 7.8 7.4 7.3 8.1 8.2
Pipeline Imports 2.5 2.1 1.9 2.1 2.4
Net Pipeline ExportsTable Note a 5.4 5.3 5.5 6.0 5.8
Value ($ billions)
Pipeline Exports 11.2 15.7 9.8 8.8 10.3
Pipeline Imports 3.9 5.1 2.7 2.7 3.6
Net Pipeline Exports 7.3 10.7 7.0 6.1 6.7

The data in this page are provided in EXCEL format (.XLSX) and are updated annually. Import and export data is filed with the National Energy Board 30 days after the end of each month. For the latest export and import data, including updates and revisions, please visit the Commodity Statistics portal.

Figure Data [EXCEL 56 KB] – Updated 13 February 2018

Contact cts-ssp@neb-one.gc.ca for further information.

Figure 1: Historical Natural Gas Trade Volumes

This figure shows natural gas traded (exported and imported) by pipeline. Export and import volumes are shown as bars, while the lines show net export volumes (exports minus imports). Pipeline exports increased by 1% since 2016, while pipeline imports have increased by 14%.

Source and Description

Source: NEB – Commodity Tracking System

Figure Description: This data description is in metric units (for imperial units, please visit the source linked above):

Natural gas pipeline export volumes were:
80.9 billion cubic metres in 2013, ranging from 6.1 to 7.9 billion cubic metres monthly. 76.3 billion cubic metres in 2014, ranging from 5.7 to 8.3 billion cubic metres monthly. 76.0 billion cubic metres in 2015, ranging from 5.8 to 7.7 billion cubic metres monthly. 84.2 billion cubic metres in 2016, ranging from 6.4 to 7.9 billion cubic metres monthly. In 2017, export volumes were 85.2 billion cubic metres, ranging from 6.4 to 8.0 billion cubic metres monthly.

Natural gas pipeline import volumes were the following:
25.5 billion cubic metres in 2013, ranging from 1.7 to 2.7 billion cubic metres monthly. 21.4 billion cubic metres in 2014, ranging from 1.1 to 2.6 billion cubic metres monthly. 19.2 billion cubic metres in 2015, ranging from 1.1 to 2.4 billion cubic metres monthly. 21.9 billion cubic metres in 2016, ranging from 1.2 to 2.7 billion cubic metres monthly. In 2017, import volumes were 24.9 billion cubic metres, ranging from 1.6 to 2.7 billion cubic metres monthly.

Updated 13 February 2018. For the latest export and import volume data, including updates and revisions, please see the Commodity Statistics report titled ‘Gas – Monthly Summary for Year’.

Figure 2: Annual Export Volumes to U.S. by Region

The NEB collects natural gas trade movements at points of entry and exit at the Canadian border based on data provided by exporters and importers. For example, after natural gas crosses the border into the U.S., it may be combined with U.S. natural gas and its final destination cannot be tracked.

This map shows the border crossings where Canadian natural gas is exported, grouped by U.S. regions. The bars show export volumes. Almost all of Canada’s natural gas exports go to the U.S. The majority of natural gas exports flow by pipeline across the border in Western Canada. Exports to U.S. East are either sourced from the Western provinces or from the storage hub in Dawn, Ontario (which contains gas from several regions, including imports from the U.S. Appalachia, U.S. Mid-continent, and Western Canada).

The majority of natural gas imports flow by pipeline across the border into Ontario. Recently, net imports have increased at the areas bordering the U.S. East because pipeline reversals have allowed growing Appalachian gas production to flow into Ontario.

Source and Description

Source: NEB – Commodity Tracking System

Figure Description:

Map description

The U.S. West region includes two ports located near the international border between British Columbia, and Washington and Idaho in the U.S. These ports are Huntingdon and Kingsgate in British Columbia.

The U.S. Midwest region includes several ports located near the international border between Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Ontario, and Montana, North Dakota, Minnesota, and Michigan in the U.S. The U.S. Midwest ports shown are Cardston, Coutts, and Aden located in Alberta; Monchy, North Portal, and Elmore located in Saskatchewan; Emerson and Sprague, Manitoba; and Sarnia, Courtright, and Ojibway (Windsor) located in Ontario.

The U.S. East region includes several ports near the international border between Ontario and Quebec, and New York, Vermont, and Maine in the U.S. The U.S. East ports shown are Niagara Falls, Chippawa, Iroquois, and Cornwall located in Ontario; Napierville and East Hereford located in Quebec; and St Stephen, New Brunswick.

Exports

The following volumes of natural gas were exported by pipeline from ports near the U.S. West border:
27.4 billion cubic metres in 2013, 26.1 billion cubic metres in 2014, 30.1 billion cubic metres in 2015, 31.9 billion cubic metres in 2016. In 2017, export volumes to U.S. West ports were 31.4 billion cubic metres.

The following volumes of natural gas were exported by pipeline from ports near the U.S. Midwest border:
43.1 billion cubic metres in 2013, 40.3 billion cubic metres in 2014, 36.6 billion cubic metres in 2015, 43.3 billion cubic metres in 2016. In 2017, export volumes to U.S. Midwest ports were 46.5 billion cubic metres.

The following volumes of natural gas were exported by pipeline from ports near the U.S. East border:
10.3 billion cubic metres in 2013, 9.9 billion cubic metres in 2014, 9.2 billion cubic metres in 2015, 9.0 billion cubic metres in 2016. In 2017, export volumes to U.S. East ports were 7.3 billion cubic metres.

Updated 3 February 2018. For the latest export data by U.S. region, including updates and revisions, please see the Commodity Statistics report titled ‘Gas – Historical Summary by Region’. The latest data by individual ports are in the import and export reports ‘Gas – Monthly Summary by Port – Volumes’.

Figure 3: Annual and Monthly Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Import Volumes

The majority of Canada’s LNG imports come from overseas, with limited volumes imported from the U.S. by truck. This graph shows the gaseous volumes. Recently, Canada has imported less LNG. The only import terminal that can receive waterborne LNG shipments in Canada is located in New Brunswick and Maritimes gas markets have become better connected by pipelines to growing gas production in North American gas markets, reducing the need for LNG imported from overseas.

Source and Description

Source: NEB – Commodity Tracking System

Figure Description: This data description is in metric units (for imperial units, please visit the source linked above):

The graph shows liquefied natural gas (LNG) import volumes:
1 031 thousand cubic metres were imported in 2013, with large shipments received in January, February, March, April, June, November, and December of that year. 557 thousand cubic metres were imported in 2014, with large shipments received in January, February, April, June, October, and December of that year. 605 thousand cubic metres were imported in 2015, with large shipments received in January, February, April, June, October, and December of that year. 329 thousand cubic metres were imported in 2016, with large shipments received in January, February, June, and July of that year. 401 thousand cubic metres were imported in 2017, with large shipments received in January, February, April, and September of that year.

Updated 3 February 2018. For the latest LNG import volume data, including updates and revisions, please see the Commodity Statistics report titled ‘LNG – Shipment Details’.

Figure 4: Annual and Monthly Trade Values

This figure shows the value, in billions of dollars, of natural gas exported and imported via pipeline. Exports and imports are shown as bars, while the lines show net exports (exports less imports). The value of natural gas exported by pipeline increased 17% since 2016, while pipeline import values increased 32%. In recent years, the overall net value of natural gas exports has declined mainly due to lower prices and demand for Canadian gas and robust natural gas supply in the U.S.

Source and Description

Source: NEB – Commodity Tracking System

Figure Description:

Natural gas pipeline export values were the following:
11.2 billion dollars in 2013, ranging from 0.7 to 1.4 billion dollars monthly. 15.7 billion dollars in 2014, ranging from 0.9 to 2.4 billion dollars monthly. 9.8 billion dollars in 2015, ranging from 0.6 to 1.5 billion dollars monthly. 8.8 billion dollars in 2016, ranging from 0.5 to 1.2 billion dollars monthly. In 2017, export values were 10.3 billion dollars, ranging from 0.6 to 1.3 billion dollars monthly.

Natural gas pipeline import values were the following:
3.9 billion dollars in 2013, ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 billion dollars monthly. 5.1 billion dollars in 2014, ranging from 0.2 to 1.1 billion dollars monthly. 2.7 billion dollars in 2015, ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 billion dollars monthly. 2.7 billion dollars in 2016, ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 billion dollars monthly. In 2017, import values were 3.6 billion dollars, ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 billion dollars monthly.

Updated 3 February 2018. For the latest export and import value data, including updates and revisions, please see the Commodity Statistics report titled ‘Gas – Monthly Summary for Year’.

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