Review of offshore drilling in the Canadian Arctic

The past is always present

Review of Offshore Drilling in the

Canadian Arctic

Preparing for the future

December 2011

Copyright/Permission to Reproduce

Review of offshore drilling in the Canadian Arctic [PDF 7075 KB]

 

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

1. Why review Arctic offshore drilling?
2. How did we gather information about offshore drilling?
What did we hear at the community meetings?
What did we hear at the Arctic Review Roundtable?
3. What does the National Energy Board regulate in the Canadian Arctic?
How are oil and gas resources managed in the North?
What is the National Energy Board’s role in reviewing applications for offshore drilling?
How do we conduct a technical review of an application for offshore drilling in Canada’s Arctic?
4. What have we learned?
What have we learned from the Ocean Ranger?
What have we learned from the Piper Alpha?
What have we learned from the crash of Cougar Helicopter Flight 491?
What have we learned from the Montara blowout?
What have we learned from the Deepwater Horizon?
What have we learned from other regulators?
How do management systems contribute to a safety culture?
How can a regulator drive development of a safety culture?

5. How can drilling be done safely while protecting the environment?
How will the National Energy Board be ready for applications to drill in the Canadian Arctic offshore?
How do we know that drilling equipment will be safe?
How will the National Energy Board make sure offshore drilling projects are safe?
What tools are used to control a well?
What is the National Energy Board‘s policy regarding same season relief wells?
What level of risk is acceptable?
6. How should we respond when things go wrong?
How are companies held responsible for emergencies or spills?
How will information be made public?
How will companies be held financially accountable in the event of a spill?
How does an operator respond to an oil spill?
How well will spill countermeasures work in the Arctic?
What infrastructure is required to respond to a spill?
7. The journey continues

 

Chapter 1: Why review Arctic offshore drilling?

The National Energy Board (NEB or Board) is the federal body responsible for regulating offshore drilling in the Canadian Arctic. It’s our job to make sure that any company who wishes to drill in this area has plans that are safe for the public, workers, and the environment. If the company can’t provide these, they can’t drill.

Through the spring and summer of 2010, people around the world watched in disbelief as the Deepwater Horizon spilled millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. H